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HI!! OH WOW, OH MY GOSH YOUR ART IS SO SO SOSOSOSOSOSO A.M.A.Z.I.N.G!!!! You have incredible talent! oh how i envy you... hahaha uhm this is probably gonna sound REALLY weird but y'know when you draw clothes, HOW DO YOU KNOW WHERE TO PUT CREASES/WRINKLES??? I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO PERFECT THE SKILL FOR SUCH A LONG TIME BUT IT NEVER EVER WORKS!! Sorry if i wasted your time *blushes* BUT YEAH YOUR ART IS GREAT *0*

FIRST OF ALL MAN OH MAN THANK YOU FOR LIKING MY STUFF ♥♥ messages like this motivate me to no end thank you

now as for the clothes; i’m far from being an expert at that myself but i’ll try to explain what i know 

to understand the way creases, wrinkles, folds and all that fun stuff works and where to put them you need to understand why they exist in the first place.

» why does fabric crease?
simply put, because there’s excess material and lack of space. fabric creases because it’s not allowed to spread out and relax. this in turn is due to different forces manipulating its flow.

let’s say you have a rectangular piece of cloth. when you stretch it and hang it up on a clothesline on two corners it should be pretty flat and wrinkle-free, right?

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but if you move the two pins closer to each other on the clothesline there will be folds.

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» why does that happen?
previously, because the fabric was stretched and secured on its outmost corners with the pins, it had no room to crease. but now that the pins are closer to each other the width of the cloth doesn’t match the distance between the pins, so it has to move from occupying only a 2D space to a 3D one to still fit.

» but how can you predict where the folds will be?
here’s where the composition of forces comes into play. gravity is omnipresent, and the only counteracting forces here are coming from the two pins—naturally, their anti-gravity force is the lowest right in the middle between the two pins, so the fabric succumbs to gravity more easily there than anywhere else.

earlier, the force of the pins was strong enough to keep the cloth so taut that even the centre was hardly affected by gravity. since this is no longer the case the fabric folds over in the middle (like i mentioned in the beginning: excess fabric + lack of space » folds!) where gravity pulls it down.

to better understand the way forces work together look at this:

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the red dot with the arrows in the middle visualises how the different forces affect the fabric in that spot

  • a: because you only have two pins on the corners that keep the fabric from falling down, the centre of the cloth will be pulled in two different directions. that’s why you get diagonal creases like that (they’re fainter the tauter your fabric is)
  • b: in this case the cloth is being held up by a bigger clamp that covers its entire width. there’s no diagonal force at work, so any potential creases will only be vertical.

under the current cirumstances you won’t find stuff like this:

image

  • a: the fold isn’t in the center where gravity is the strongest, which is inconsequential (unless you have another force like the wind affecting the fabric)
  • b: it’s in the nature of matter to choose the path of least resistance, and an unnecessary fold in the middle like that wouldn’t make sense

now if you take things a step further and remove one of the pins, the cloth completely collapses in on itself. the centre of force shifts to the singular pin, and the cloth follows suit.

image

» that’s very nice but how do i know where exactly the folds go in that mess?
short answer; you don’t. longer answer; you do know the applicable forces now, so you know the general direction of the folds. no horizontal creases happening here. the rest is observational work (you won’t know what stuff looks like unless you look at it irl) and trusting your gut! there’s no “one correct way” the cloth would crease, and as long as you keep the size of the cloth in mind and don’t break any laws of physics you’re good to go.

» other things that will always affect the way your clothes crease, apart from gravity:

  • friction: it’s basically as omnipresent as gravity and counteracts other forces in a lot of ways. it’s one of the reasons your sleeve doesn’t immediately slip down the entire length of your arm when you lift it.
  • the fabric’s stiffness, which is directly related to the material it’s made of. a sheer satin shawl will wrinkle more easily and noticeably than a thick woollen scarf.

look at this:

image

you know now that creases have to appear somewhere here, because you’re pushing the fabric together (exerting force » excess material, lack of space, you know the deal). then consider this:

image

this is essentially what happens to the piece of fabric up there. always keep this in mind when you draw folds: they exist because fabric overlaps so it fits into the space it’s allowed to occupy. (which is determined by the forces it’s subjected to. i know i’m repeating myself but at least that’ll hopefully help you remember it because it’s vital to your understanding of folds)

a few more examples:

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i wont go further into the different types of folds because this guide here is pretty much everything you need. i suggest taking a look at this before you continue reading!

» now comes the fun part: applying your knowledge!
aka why you don’t do this:

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but something more like this instead:

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let’s analyse these one by one. the situation for all of them is fundamentally the same: gravity pulls the pants down, the waistband holds them up, and the fabric wraps around the legs. the resulting folds are determined by the fit and the type of fabric.

  • a: loose sweatpants. a few vertical folds, especially around the knee area where the fabric is stretched (from when you sit down). then it hits the feet and crumples up, because it can’t fall down freely anymore; that results in horizontal, zigzaggy folds.
  • b: fitted jeans. gravity doesn’t play as big of a role here; the main reason the fabric crinkles is because it has to fit itself to the form of the legs. it’s being pulled taut around the area of the crotch » horizontal creases. it crinkles around the knee when you bend your leg » zigzag folds. and again, like the sweatpants, it’ll bunch up around your ankles
  • c: sturdy shorts. unlike the sweatpants those hardly have vertical creases because the fabric is stiffer and holds its shape. that in turn leads to a lot of wrinkle imprints from e.g. sitting down. socks have hardly any wrinkles because they’re very stretchy and fit neatly around your feet/calves!

» what happens to flowy fabric, things like skirts?

image

  • a: regular circumstances, only gravity (green) is pulling the skirt down, so you only have vertical folds
  • b: but if you add a strong wind (yellow) coming from the right, the skirt is subjected to two forces pulling it in two different directions. this results in vertical folds (red)! and the stronger the wind is, the more horizontal the creases are (until, of course, the flow of the fabric is inhibited by the body it wraps around)

image

and a final tip: remember that all of this theoretical knowledge will only genuinely help you once you’ve an idea about what folds & co. look like! study your own clothes, other people’s clothes, curtains, tablecloths, blankets, you name it. pay attention.

tl;dr important things:

  • which forces apply? how do they affect each other?
  • what’s the original shape of the fabric; 3D (tube) or 2D?
  • what’s the fabric made of? (» rigidity, stretchability, thickness, etc.)
  • which form(s) does the fabric wrap around? how loosely does it fit?
  • fabric creases to fit inside the space it’s allowed to occupy
  • gravity and friction always meddle with your clothes
  • thin fabric will have more wrinkles than thick one
  • stiff fabric will have imprints of wrinkles even without influencing forces due to the memory of the material (think about the perpetually wrinkled area around the knees of your jeans)
  • creases & co. always appear near the point of origin of a force, not far away from it





Your art is so beautiful T-T How you do that T-T

i have a quality helper





anon replies [1]

with doodles under the cut because i realise they only litter your dash i’m sorry please blacklist soodyoask if you don’t want to see them

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  soodyoask    anon  




Anonymous:

do you draw the hearts in the hair shine on purpose or??

image
when the other heart is hurting you need a sparkly hair heart to make up for it right





Anonymous:

Konbanwa!! I am the person that has liked most everything on your page and just wanted to say that I really really really really like your drawings!! I wish to become as awesome of a drawer as you are and wish you happiness in your future!! *hugs*

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  anon    soodyoask  




Anonymous:

HOLY MOTHER OF A TEACUP YOUR ART IS THE BEST EVER I WANT TO SMOTHER MY FACE IN IT

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I know you get this a lot, but your blog and your art make my heart feel warm inside. You have super amazing head canons and they dazzle me with their superbness.

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Anonymous:

hello! um, this is quite embarrassing for me to ask, since I'm totally not educated on some stuff, but do you do commissions? if so, would you be able to draw me? if not, would you be able to draw me for free? sorry for the ignorant question, I just think you're really talented, and I need a new icon for my blog! (I would give you credit of course) thanks!

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  anon    soodyoask  




3rd year nitori probably has permanently messed up hair thanks to exasperated hair-ruffling






U HAVE GOOD A RT ma yb e......

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